Bridges, not Barriers

Recently I attended an event with both current and retired teachers. At my table the conversation came around to storm days and the impact on education. At one point the youngest participant spoke. “What get’s me, is parents who take their child out of school to go on a family trip.” He obviously wasn’t impressed… Continue reading Bridges, not Barriers

Think Alouds – PART I

Recently, I ran into a former teammate who happens to be half my age. We had a nice chat, and he mentioned that just a week earlier he and his wife became parents for the first time. His excitement was apparent. When I asked if I could offer some advice, he agreed. Suddenly, in my… Continue reading Think Alouds – PART I

I Came This Close – Part I

I haven’t told this story very often. It is something of which I am not particularly proud. It occurred twenty-two years ago. It involved a grade 12 student. I came this close (picture my open hands, palms facing inward, should-width apart) to punching him in the face. His transgression? He stuck his tongue in my… Continue reading I Came This Close – Part I

Class Size

Not long ago I was chatting with a few early-career teachers. The conversation came around to class size. I asked them what they thought the ideal class size would be. Each did so and with adequate clarification. Their answers varied depending on grade level with distinctions for primary, elementary and secondary levels. I listened as… Continue reading Class Size

The Jig is Up

I wasn’t very far into the first year of my career. I was teaching chemistry and physics in Corner Brook, Newfoundland. One day, one of my students was absent. Jokingly, I said to the class, “I hope he isn’t playing hookey.” One of my students asked, “Hookey? What do you mean by that?” “Hookey, you… Continue reading The Jig is Up

Fifty-Fifty

Several years ago, my wife and I were attending a fund-raising event. Following the meal, a high school student came around with fifty-fifty tickets. He approached our table. “Fifty-Fifty tickets. One for two or five for three.” I spoke, “You meant, one for two or three for five, right?” “That’s right. That’s what I said.… Continue reading Fifty-Fifty

Pardon me Pontiff

As I was completing my BEd degree at St. Thomas University (STU), my fiance and I agreed that we would accept the first teaching position offered. As it turned out, that offer came from Newfoundland, but there was a problem. In order to be certified in Newfoundland it was necessary to have two English credits.… Continue reading Pardon me Pontiff