Battery Recycling – PART I

In 2003 I started a battery recycling program at my school. At that time there were few options for the disposal of small batteries. Students and community members were invited to drop off any type of household battery. The spent batteries were then shipped to a recycling plant in Ontario. Shipping and processing costs were covered by grants. Over the years, TD (Toronto Dominion Bank) Friends of the Environment and the New Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund never turned down my requests for funding.

In 2004 I decided to expand the program, and district schools were invited to participate. The elementary school across the road agreed to join in. The teacher who took responsibility for the program was very enthusiastic.

To kick off her school’s participation, she told students that if they brought in batteries their names would be entered into a draw for prizes. It worked; batteries started to roll in.

The following week, word started trickling in that some parents were noticing their VCR and TV remote controls weren’t working. Upon opening the devices it was discovered that the batteries were missing. Apparently, their children were more focused on the prize than the purpose.

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2 thoughts on “Battery Recycling – PART I

  1. Still love your vignettes, Gary. When I was a kid, we’d steal the mercury from my Granny’s hearing aid batteries. It had no value, but was fun to juggle in our palms, or put in our trousers to convert pennies into dimes. I’m only a little brain-damaged as a result.

    On Fri., Sep. 13, 2019, 06:23 5 W’s of Education, wrote:

    > Gary Caines posted: “In 2003 I started a battery recycling program at my > school. At that time there were few options for the disposal of small > batteries. Students and community members were invited to drop off any type > of household battery. The spent batteries were then shipp” >

    Like

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